Jul

30

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 30, 2015

Eccfwsd-Before - 1

Eccfwsd-After

By Bill Goheen
Special to The Monitor
GUN BARREL CITY–On May 23, East Cedar Creek Fresh Water Supply District (ECCFWSD) General Manager Bill Goheen attended the initial FEMA/Texas Department of Emergency Management meeting. Gun Barrel City and Payne Springs, who receive water and sewer service from ECCFWSD, were also present. The preliminary meeting with affected communities and Public Non-Profit Entities introduced the application process for FEMA Funding under the Disaster Relief Act. The proclamation was enacted to assist the many counties in Texas due to the massive flooding and wind damages that occurred in May and June of 2015.
It was explained that if damages have occurred and recovery is urgent, repairs should be expedited with valid documentation and the expense incurred will be reimbursed under the program, if the application is approved. Under the FEMA Disaster Relief Program (matching) Grant, 75 percent would be reimbursed.
Water and sewer lines were impacted by flooding and massive erosion that exposed the lines that cross the waterway located in the 300 block of Long Leaf in the Tamarack Subdivision, where storm water runs east into Cedar Creek Lake.
The water main was also exposed. A temporary repair was made to restore water service. The integrity was still in jeopardy long-term, so the District hired Triple A Contractor to relocate the water main per District Engineer recommendations.
The new water main is two feet below the waterway bed. The expense to date for the disaster recovery is $13,500 with a cost yet to be expensed for applying rip-rap along the improved banks of the affected water and sewer easement and approximately 30-feet upstream and 30-feet downstream of the District’s easement area. We appreciated the property owners understanding and patience while we improved integrity for water and sewer service in their area. Accompanying this article are before and after photos of the project.
I would like to respond to the Letter to the Editor by Dee Watkins published in the Sunday July 26, 2015 edition of The Monitor. ECCFWSD staff does not swear at the public. If conflict does occur, staff is instructed to contact the immediate supervisor to respond/handle the situation and if necessary, contact the General Manager or call 9-1-1.
Under the editor’s note, I was quoted as stating that ECCFWSD will make good the damages to Dee Watkin’s barrier. That is true. However, the costliness of the repairs was said not in relationship to replacing Watkin’s barrier, but rather to the cost of relocating the water main, dirt work and rip rap required to restore integrity to the water and sewer lines.
This additional dirt work will benefit Dee Watkins and the neighbors on the north side of the waterway in lessening the risk of further erosion.

Jul

30

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 30, 2015

Harold Weeden, 81, of Driftwood, Texas passed away from heart complications, surrounded by family and close friends July 14, 2015.
The celebration of his life was held July 18, 2015, at Dripping Springs Methodist Church and reception followed at Mercer Street Dancehall.
Harold was born to Will Weeden and Rosa Gunderson Weeden in Van Zandt County, Texas, on July 16, 1933.
Harold is survived by his three children, Sherry Huffman of Driftwood, Texas, Michael Weeden of San Marcos, Texas and Mark Weeden of Vista, California; seven grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.
He is also survived by his loving wife, El Rose Weeden. Harold and Rose were married May 21, 1960, in Houston, Texas.
Harold is preceded in death by his parents, his sister Lily Rose Jester, and his brothers Will, John and Douglas Weeden.
Harold enlisted in the Army in 1951, at the age of 18, and served as a paratrooper in the Korean War with the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, first as a sniper and later as a machine gunner.
He was wounded in combat in 1952, and was awarded the Purple Heart. Harold is a Life Member of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Chapter 1919. He was also active in the Lone Star Chapter of the “Rakkasans,” 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team Association.
Harold worked for Fisk Electric Company from 1957, until 1972, where he served as the general foreman on the construction of Shell Plaza One and the Astrodome. From 1973 through 1993, Harold was a home builder with his two sons and invested in real estate in Vista, California.
Harold was an accomplished guitar player and his greatest joy was sharing his love for music, singing and song writing with his family and friends.
Throughout his life, he played regularly at honkytonks, juke joints and dancehalls, where he entertained and uplifted thousands with his musical talent and original songs. A captivating story teller, Harold often regaled family and friends with stories and jokes shared from his many travels and experiences.
He enjoyed spending time with his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He cherished his Texas roots and was an avid historian and Conservative.
A self-made success story despite his humble upbringing, Harold inspired all those around him to self-reliance and hard work. He will be missed deeply by his wife, family and countless friends. The goodness Harold brought to the world and the joy he brought to all he touched will always be remembered.

Jul

30

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 30, 2015

Keith Foisey for WEB
By Erik Walsh
Monitor Sports Editor
KEMP–Kemp resident Keith Foisey has proved yet again that he is a master at his craft after becoming the Deerman’s 3-D True Hunting Experience (THE) world champion in Ada, Oklahoma July 18-19.
Foisey’s world championship win came on the heels of the Texas title he claimed last May and places him as the best 3-D target archer from the 30-foot range in the entire THE system.
The success has came quickly for Foisey, who just recently took up target shooting last February. When he showed up to his first event in May, which happened to be the Texas Championship, the grandness of the event and competitors nearly intimidated him into going home without shooting.
“At the time I had no experience and I didn’t even know what class I would shoot in,” Foisey said. “I looked around and other archers had much more expensive bows.”
After talking with his wife, Foisey decided that he had nothing to lose and shot anyway. It was a good decision.
“I decided to just go for it,” he said. “We already made the drive anyway,” he said with a chuckle.
Foisey likes shooting with THE because of its sportsman ideals and humane mentality treating wildlife with respect; only taking the shot if you can attain a clean kill. To simulate a true hunting experience, THE sets up its courses with brush and obstacles between the archer and the target.
“I’ve been bow hunting for more than 10 years now, and 3D targets are a great way to stay sharp,” Foisey said. If you are hunting in the woods, that deer is probably not going to walk out into the open for you. If you don’t secure a clean kill, you may never find the animal and it could suffer an agonizing death.”
THE rewards a top score of 15 points per round with a shot to the most vital part of the heart. A small flinch dropping the arrow low could miss the vitals entirely and give the archer –5 points for the round.
This is all that separated Foisey from winning the Oklahoma state tournament in June.
“The competition level at these tournaments is such a high level,” he said. “I missed one of my targets by a quarter-inch and scored negative five points. The winner scored just 13 points higher than I.”
With just one shot separating him from a third title, Foisey has progressed much faster than he ever expected and puts in the time each day to keep improving. He shoots at least 50 arrows a day to stay sharp, averaging about an hour and a half of practice time each day between his range at home and On Target in Canton.
“Considering I just started target shooting this year, this has all been a pleasant surprise to me,” he said. “The guys at On Target peeked my interest in target shooting and it’s been a great experience.”
Foisey says that he is practicing on shooting from farther distances for next season.
“Next year I will go to the 40-yard class and give it a try,” he said. “I didn’t expect to win at the 30, so who knows, I may do well at the 40 also. I’ll give it a try.”