May

20

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 20, 2016

Brandon Shipp signs with SWC

By Ryan Moulds
Monitor Sports Writer
KEMP–Kemp senior point guard Brandon Shipp signed to play basketball at Southwestern Christian University, May 17 in the Kemp High School cafeteria.
“I’m very excited about playing for Southwestern Christian,” Shipp said. “It’s not too far away from home and I can come back any time. It’s a good college in a good location and I feel like the coaching staff can help me get where I need to be for my future.”
Unlike most NAIA schools, Southwestern Christian has a coach with several years of major college basketball experience. Dave Bliss coached at Oklahoma, SMU, New Mexico, and Baylor from 1975-2003. He has a career coaching record of 543-343 and will be in his second season as Head Coach of Southwestern Christian.
“Coach Bliss can get me to the level where I want to play at,” Shipp said. He can possibly help me reach a point where I can play in the NCAA at the division one or two level.”
Before signing with Southwestern Christian, Shipp also had interest from University of Dallas and Eastern Nazarene College.
Shipp served as a leader on and off the court for the Yellowjackets this season. He averaged 12 points per game, four rebounds per game, two assists and two steals per game.
He started 26 of 29 games this season for a Kemp team that finished 14-15 and almost made the playoffs in one of the toughest 3A districts in the state.
Shipp battled adversity all season long. After a serious eye injury sent him to the hospital in a tough loss to Maypearl Jan. 29. He was forced to sit out the next two games against Scurry-Rosser and Palmer. Despite not being able to play in the games, Shipp still helped support and coach his team from the sideline. Kemp won both games and played with extra motivation.
“I definitely think that we were playing for Shipp tonight,” fellow senior Jay Kohlmeier said after his team’s win over Scurry-Rosser back on Feb. 2. “We know that he would want us to play hard and get this victory.”
All of Shipp’s teammates speak highly of his character and his dedication to the game. “You can tell that when Shipp is on the court he gives max effort,” fellow senior Dylan Dennis said. “It makes it a lot easier when you are playing with somebody who always gives their all and is passionate about what they are doing.”
“The bond we had as a team this season was amazing,” Shipp said. “We had great chemistry between us and the coaching staff.” Shipp gives Kemp Head Coach Jordan Bedford the credit for helping him become the player that he is today. “He has really helped define me,” Shipp said. “Not just as a basketball player but as a person as well. He has really helped me change a lot of my ways throughout these last four years and he has made me a better man.”
Southwestern Christian went 19-15 in their first season with Bliss as coach. Shipp thinks that they are a better team then their record indicates. “I looked at the stats from last season,” he said. “It looks like they could have been a playoff team. My main goals are to come in and help build them up and create the culture of a successful program. I hope that I can be a part of a winning season.”
Despite leaving for college, Shipp says that Kemp will have a special place in his heart and that he will miss his teammates and coaches from high school. “I want to thank all the fan, students , and people in the community for their support,” Shipp said. “I want to thank them for coming to the games and for helping us have a successful basketball season because without there support none of the success we had would be possible.”

May

20

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 20, 2016

malakoff state track meet

By Ryan Moulds
Monitor Sports Writer
AUSTIN–Malakoff junior Tyler Russell took home first place in the high jump at the UIL State Track Meet in Austin, May 13-14.
Russell had a jump of six feet, 10 inches. He edged out Grandview’s Trenton Wallace, who had a height of six feet, nine inches. The state record is seven feet, four inches.
Russell also finished sixth in the long jump at 21 feet, 9¼ inches. Cisco’s Taylor Massey won the event with a jump of 23 feet, 1¾ inches.
Russell wasn’t the only local athlete to compete in the meet, Kemp’s Elijah Gardiner finished in sixth place in the Class 3A triple jump with a leap of 44 feet, nine inches. Cisco’s Taylor Massey won the event with a distance of 46 feet, eight inches.
Mabank’s Cameron Boren finished in ninth place in the Class 4A 1,600-meter run with a time of 4:55.64. Robinson’s Johen Deleon won with a time of 4:22.89.
Eustace Bulldog Colton Summerall finished seventh in the Class 3A 110-meter hurdles with a time of 15.11 seconds. Massey won the race with a time of 14.39. Also for Eustace, Ericsen Gudjohnson finished in fifth place in the Class 3A, 1,600-meter run with a time of 4:27.47. The winner of the event was Whitesboro’s Jeffrey Butts with a time of 4:15.82.
In the Class A triple jump, Trinidad’s Erica Airheart finished eighth at 33 feet, 1 ¼ inches. Tilden McMullen’s Makinna Serrata won the event with a jump of 35 feet, 10-1/2 inches.
Athens senior Travon Fuller finished in eighth place in the Class 4A 400-meter run with a time of 50.41. Lufkin Hudson’s Payton Davis won with a time of 48.11.
Cross Roads Ladycat Rebecca Kramer finished third in Class 2A shotput with a throw of 38 feet, 10 ½ inches. Panhandle’s Brooklyn Tompkins won the event at 42 feet, 4 inches.

May

19

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 19, 2016

BALI INDONESIA BESAKIH MOTHER TEMPLE BALI

BALI INDONESIA BESAKIH MOTHER TEMPLE BALI

By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer
CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Few people ever get beyond wishful thinking when it comes to working toward and achieving their goals and dreams, like traveling and seeing the world. However, some have, like Josephine and Bill Miniat of Cedar Creek Lake.
The retired couple are approaching their 60th wedding anniversary Sept. 1 and have clocked hundreds of thousands of miles and a total of 900 days on the water (by cruise ship or river boat) over the past 10 years.
They look forward to several more trips, hopefully to Israel and Egypt; also areas around Alberta, Canada, and northern Africa are yet to be explored. Other places they have visited several times and observed the changes taking place, such as those in China, Russia and Southeast Asia.
Bill got a taste for such exotic destinations while working as a manufacturing executive in the electronics industry with Magnovox and Curtis Mathis. His business dealings often took him to Southeast Asia. Since retiring from a second career as a local home developer during the real estate boom of the early ’90s, he has booked numerous cruises and inland jaunts, along with his wife Jo. Together the pair have catalogued numerous photos and kept a travel journal of their experiences and observations.
“Americans better wake up,” he said. “We need to get out of our comfortable little bubble and expand our vision of the world,” he surmises from his nearly three trips a year.
He believes instead of becoming more and more like Europe with its political correctness, Americans need to rediscover their own inventiveness, reinvigorate a strong work ethic and blaze new trails in the current economy.
In his travels, he said, the middle class is practically non-existent, while the poor and super rich stand in stark contrast to one another. He also noted a veneration of past greatness as evidenced by the many beautiful temples and the worship still offered there, while power brokers seemingly ignore the potential of the present, as they guard the status quo.
Visits to Moslem and Communist-controlled countries reveal the tight control the government holds over its people and tourists to its countries. Armed men were frequent sights on the streets of countries like China, India, Dubai and large cities in Indonesia, Bill said.
“There were many places where taking photographs are not allowed. And taking photos of the guards, forts or security points are strictly forbidden,” he said. “Crossing a border can take hours,” he added.
In Dubai, no one can gain citizenship who is not native to the country. He also noted “enslaved labor” from India is one of the oil-rich country’s major imports.
While visiting Petra near the shores of the Dead Sea, a hike back to the bus seemed impossible for Bill who was growing ill by the moment. So the couple went “off tour” to find a donkey and local help to take him up in elevation where a cab could help the couple reconnect with their bus. “Upon arrival, the guards with the tour bus were visibly upset that they had lost track of us,” Jo said.
The couple also noted that other well-off travelers (mostly from Europe) and a few from the U.S. form their own sub-culture, running into one another on various trips, enjoying each other’s company and becoming fast friends as long as the trip lasts. They learn what things to guard against in various ports of call and tourist attractions.
In Naples, Italy and Ho Chi Min, Vietnam, tourists are warned against pickpockets from brazen gypsies or slick operators, who lift a wallet and elude discovery for hours afterward.
While in Prague, Bill admitted to being hood-winked during a monetary exchange. “I exchanged American dollars for worthless currency,” he said. “We’ve learned to be very careful.”
In other places, such as Singapore and Myanmar (old Burma), where values of honesty and hospitality hold weight with those who hope in an afterlife, a local store manager has chased Bill down as he departed having purchased a book to restore money wrongfully collected in the transaction.
When asked if the couple have ever gotten cross-eyed with one another while on a trip, the answer was no. “We’ve learned, at our age, there aren’t that many things worth getting upset about,” Jo said. “Age and experience has put things into greater perspective.”
This local couple have gained a ‘greater perspective’ in a lot of areas from their travels. Neither spend time watching television anymore, but rather enjoy learning through reading and thinking.
The couple also shared stories of how they dealt with illness while on their various journeys. Both he and Jo have experienced various health challenges during their retirement. Though on one of their first trips, Bill said his body shut down and he had to be hospitalized for a week in England, the experience hasn’t dampened his enthusiasm for travel.
“I’ve had a great ride, to be able to do these things is a blessing,” Bill said. “I’ve learned what the world is all about, having seen it with my own eyes, and greeting people of different cultures, seeing how they live and get along. It’s been worth all the hard work, saving and sacrificing to be able to travel. I highly recommend it.”