Jun

16

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : June 16, 2017


Special to The Monitor
CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Many high schools, colleges and universities emphasize their goals of producing well-rounded students. Extracurricular activities teach students important life lessons, provide them opportunities to socialize and often stimulate their minds and bodies in ways that differ from the stimulation provided in the classroom.
Data from the U.S. Census Bureau states that, in 2014, 57 percent of children between the ages of six and 17 participate in at least one after-school extracurricular activity. Children are more likely to participate in sports than clubs or lessons, such as music, dance and language, but each of these activities can be beneficial to students’ development.
Students who participate in extracurricular activities may want to limit their participation to 20 hours per week. This is according to a group of professors from Stanford University and Villanova University who have been collecting data on the issue since 2007. In their report “Extracurricular Activity in High-Performing School Contexts: Stress Buster, Booster or Buffer?”, Jerusha Conner and Sarah Miles found that 87 percent of kids who would be considered to have packed schedules were perfectly happy unless they were doing more than four hours a day.
The “over-scheduling hypothesis” may be overhyped. This is the concern that too much organized activity participation leads to poor developmental outcomes. This hypothesis also suggests that hectic schedules also undermine family functioning, detract from schoolwork and possibly increase the risk of copycat behaviors and excessive competitiveness. However, in the study “The Over-Scheduling Hypothesis Revisited: Intensity of Organized Activity Participation During Adolescence and Young Adult Outcomes,” researchers J.L. Mahoney and Andrea Vest determined that, controlling for demographic factors and baseline adjustment, extracurricular intensity was a significant predictor of positive outcomes and unrelated to indicators of problematic adjustment (e.g., psychological distress, substance use, antisocial behavior) at young adulthood.
Even though extracurricular activities are largely positive – even when schedules are packed – parents need to be aware of the diminishing returns of too many activities. This is something called the “threshold effect.” Benefits from extracurriculars can level off when too many activities are being juggled. If a child is experiencing anxiety, sleeplessness or depression, or seems overly stressed, it could be time to reduce students’ time spent doing structured activities.

Jun

16

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : June 16, 2017

By Erik Walsh
Monitor Staff Writer
KEMP–Kemp city council members held two public hearings in one night to speed up annexing a commercial property into Kemp city limits June 13.
The property, located across the street from the high school on Highway 274, belongs to Elfega Picena Sanchez, who plans to open the third location of a chain of Mexican drive-through restaurants called Little Mexico. The other locations are in Gun Barrel City and Kaufman.
Even though the property is across the street from the high school, awkward zoning still puts the lot outside of the city limits. To be a part of the city’s water and sewer system the property needs to be annexed into the fold.
Kemp Mayor Laura Peace said there wasn’t a squeak of opposition to the annexation after posting a notice at least five days prior to the council meeting.
“If anyone had something to say against the annexation we wouldn’t have moved on this so quickly,” Peace said.
Council members were also introduced to new Kemp Police Chief Bradley DeLaughter. DeLaughter is a familiar face around the Kemp police force, as he has been with KPD since August of 2015. He became Chief last Friday after candidates were interviewed Thursday. Former Interim Chief James Cook is back on regular patrol duty.
The council also continued taking steps to be eligible to apply for grants from the Texas Water Development Board. The final obstacle for application was adopting a water conservation plan, which the council unanimously approved Tuesday. Mayor Peace said the plan can be amended later after the city’s needs are made clearer, but stressed the need to implement it quickly to become eligible for grant application. Peace and councilwoman Christi Neal stressed the importance of conservation.
“We want to promote community conservation,” Peace said. “It’s possible that we will introduce some watering restrictions in the future.”
“We need to be pro-active,” Neal said. “We don’t need to be in the middle of a drought to conserve water.”
In other news, council members:
• approved a resolution authorizing a continued partnership with the Atmos Cities Steering Committee and authorized the payment of two cents per capita to ACSC. An Atmos rep at the meeting said, “This is an attorney fee to keep Kemp represented in the committee.”
• approved City Administrator Regina Kiser to sign the grant application documents to the Texas Water Development Board.
• heard during staff reports of a six-inch main water line that needed repair on Pearl Street the past month.

Jun

16

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : June 16, 2017


Funeral services for Lowell Duncan Pahl will be held Saturday, June 24, 2017 at 11 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Mabank.
Graveside service will be at 3 p.m. at King Cemetery. Lowell was born on April 1, 1931 in Merrill, Wis. to parents Ethan Pahl and Wilma Duncan Pahl and entered into eternal rest on April 19, 2017 at the age of 86.
Lowell was in the United States Army and served for 20 years. He retired as MSgt. Lowell was stationed in Japan, Hawaii, Germany and Ft. Devens in Ayer, Mass. and served in the Korean War.
Lowell graduated Milwaukee School of Engineering and Upper Iowa University with two Bachelor’s degrees. He was married to the love of his life for over 50 years, Maxine Callahan Pahl, who preceded him in death on July 17, 2000.
Lowell enjoyed being outside, cutting trees and building things. He loved spending time with his family, friends and going out to eat. Lowell volunteered at the food bank, was a member of the Masonic Cedar Creek Lake Lodge #1431, where he served as past Master, Roddy Lodge #734 in Mabank and Masonic Lodge #528 in Kemp.
He was also a member and past Patron of Eastern Star GBC Chapter #1114, Rainbow Girls #369 as a past Rainbow Dad and on the advisory board. Lowell was a member of the VFW #4376 of Seven Points and American Legion #310 in Gun Barrel City.
He was an active member in several Methodist churches, including Westford, Mass. and Garland. Lowell was a long-time member of First Presbyterian Church in Mabank.
He was an amazing man, who will be missed tremendously by those who knew and loved him.
Lowell was preceded in death by his parents, wife Maxine Pahl, great-grandson Austin Young, brothers Darren Pahl, Dean Pahl, Rodney Pahl and sister Phyllis Pahl.
He is survived by his daughter Linda Teppenpaw of Seven Points, son Rodney Pahl and wife Linda, Aaron Pahl of Hudson, N.H., grandchildren Lauren Soucy and husband Bob of Leominster, Mass., Connie Young and husband Rory of Parker, Colo., George Lowell Weilenmann and Jack French of Broomfiled, Colo., Rodney Pahl of Florida, Raymond Pahl of Florida, Jared Pahl of Florida, Ann Covey and husband Jim of Hudson, N.H., Chuck Lyons of Hudson, N.H., nine great-grandchildren and six great-great grandchildren, sister Yvonne DiFrancisco of Calif. and sister Kathy, brother Carrol Pahl of Ohio, other loving family members and many more friends.
In lieu of flowers the family requests that donations be made in Lowell’s honor, to First Presbyterian Church of Mabank, Cedar Creek Lake Lodge #1431, Roddy Lodge-Mabank #734, Kemp Lodge #528, Eastern Star GBC #1114 or Rainbow Girls #369.
A personal tribute may be made online at www.eubankcedarcreek.com.