Jul

30

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 30, 2015

Picture FolderVinson Obit

Funeral services for Julius Vincent and Susan Dianne Voyles are set for 10 a.m. Friday, July 31, 2015, at the First Baptist Church, Malakoff. Mr. and Mrs. Voyles passed away Saturday, July 25 in Waco, TX.
Julius was born June 7, 1956, in Amarillo, TX to Julius Vincent Sr. and Norma Bearden Voyles.
He was one of 10 children.
Susan was born in Grand Saline, TX to Kenneth Dale Williams Sr. and Syble Scott Williams. She had five brothers and sisters.
They are survived by their children, Michael and wife Patricia Voyles, Brian and wife Crystal Voyles, Shayla and husband Randy Hardee. Parents Kenneth Dale Williams Sr., Syble Williams and Norma Voyles. They are also survived by their brothers and sisters Connie Rodriguez, Edward Voyles, Dana Jara, Keith Voyles, Kerry Voyles, Scotty McGee, Ellon Davis, Patricia McGee, Sheree Miranda, Renee Dopp, Sheree Johnson, Nena Kendall, Sahrina Strickland, Kenneth Williams Jr.
Their beautiful legacy continues with eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Vincent is preceded in death by his father Julius Voyles Sr.
Pallbearers for Susan will be Stonn Maynard, Josh Jennings, Sam Morgan, James Brown, Jeremy Baker, Tyler Jones.
Pallbearers for Juluis will be Keith Voyles, Edward Voyles, Scotty McGee, Rocky Reeves, Arron Smithhart, BJ Rodriguez.
Visitation will be held from 6 – 8 p.m. Thursday, July 30, at the First Baptist Church, Malakoff, TX.
Interment will be in the Malakoff Cemetery.

Jul

26

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 26, 2015

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4006-V-IMG_3895

By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer
KEMP—Nearly 100 Kaufman County residents met to talk about the condition of roads in Precinct 4 Tuesday. At Kings Creek Golf Club in Kemp, hosts Jim Valentine and past candidate for commissioner Joe Windham opened the publicized meeting with a little background, history and current state of affairs before other voices jumped in to add their complaints to the mix.
Among those present were Kemp ISD Superintendent Edward Phillips, school trustee Lynda Page and representatives from the Mabank Fire Department.
Windham said before the current sheriff took office and the new jail was built 11 cents of every dollar of tax money was dedicated to roads. In those days, roads were built to last and all was right with the world, according to him. Now with a growing county population around 100,000 just 5.2 cents of every dollar goes into the Road and Bridge Fund shared by four commissioners.
“We want money for roads to be the county’s priority,” Windham said, pointing out that twice the voters have turned down a new courthouse building.
“We shouldn’t get anything else until we get good roads,” he said. He feels the same way about completing funding for the new 9-1-1 Center housed in the former armory or adding another court.
“You’ll find that roads rarely get on the agenda (at Commissioners Court),” he said. “We need to stick together and say ‘you’re not having anymore until we get good roads.’ We’ve got to have transportation.”
He said the Sheriff’s Office, including the jail system, is funded to the tune of $4 million a year.
“I’ve been broken into four times and the Sheriff’s Office never showed up. The CID is a joke. Every one of you need to be getting angry … very, very angry,” he said.
Not only was he angry that roads are not be funded to the level necessary, Windham said the quality of road maintenance is not near good enough. He said last year, CR 3094 was repaired and $15 million spent on it. “It’s all coming apart,” he said. “Once one of the best roads in the county, it is quickly becoming one of the worst roads.”
He further claimed 61 miles of county roads are nearly impassable.
Fred Carter a Mabank Fire Department volunteer recalled a recent ambulance call to pick up someone who had died at home and the road to get there was so torn up with potholes the top speed was 10 mph. What if we were responding to an emergency? He asked.
Some claimed that it will take a tragedy, likely one involving a school bus full of kids on one of these rural roads, before anything meaningful will get done. Some have suggested a tragedy has already occurred but no one knows for certain. Only questions about why after a legless man was killed in a head-on collision driving on a sunny Father’s Day on CR 4019 that potholes were filled within days.
Precinct 4 Commissioner Jakie Allen was notably absent, explaining he wasn’t interested in attending a gripe session but would welcome a list of possible solutions.
Windham voiced that county residents have to be ready to accept a property tax increase of two to three cents on every $100 of taxable property.
He noted that those in the room older than 65 would be exempt due to the tax ceiling on the amount paid by age 65, as long as you live in the home. “Even if the 11 cents were restored, that will not be enough,” Windham said.
Others said if funding is being diverted to house prisoners, shouldn’t their labor be used to fix roads?
A woman used her phone to look up a state law outlining the duties of county commissioners, among them submitting a monthly audit on roads.
Another woman looked up the amount the county is to collect from car registration that’s to be dedicated to road maintenance, is that going into the Road and Bridge Fund, she asked.
Windham also suggested if a piece of equipment goes down in Precinct 4, shouldn’t the commissioners pool their hard assets to cover one another, so work doesn’t have to come to a halt during good weather because a grinder or two stop working.
It was also noted that there are 12,600 registered voters in the county of which only 3,800 voted in the last election. Being a registered voter, getting involved by following the activity of Commissioners Court through online videos or in person and using your voting power sends a strong message to elected officials, Woodham said.
“My recommendation is we work to raise more tax money dedicated to roads, by creating a voting block,” Woodham said.
Budget workshops start in August. “Make sure the Sheriff doesn’t get all the money,” Woodham said. He held up a sheaf of papers, representing the 2015 FY budget.
“Every department needs to be audited,” he said. “I found $4 million set aside in miscellaneous and office furniture,” he said. “Stop the waste.”
After the meeting, a gentleman who’s been clipping newspapers for years on the subject of potholes approached The Monitor to tell it of a recently developed piece of equipment and a cold slurry mix that includes an emulsion, aggregate and activator for patching potholes that has proven to last up to 12 years. It was introduced in Dallas in 2002 was well liked, except for the labor intensity. Since then the company has developed and produced a piece of equipment that greatly reduces the labor.
Supposedly, Dallas is about to close in on a contract with the company.
“It’s a new way of filling potholes that is cost-effective and lasts a long time,” Bill Harris told The Monitor. The company can be found at dotpotholefiller.com.
“It’s obvious that the ‘throw and go’ method of pothole repair is pouring good money down a rathole, maybe it’s time to try something different.”

Jul

26

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 26, 2015

David Jones - 2011 tenntuck wc

By Erik Walsh
Monitor Sports Editor
KEMP–David “Bird” Jones is an emerging name in the street racing scene and is getting close to an opportunity to make an appearance on the Discovery Channel TV show Street Outlaws.
One could say racing is in the blood of the 2008 Kemp ISD graduate. He has been racing since he was 12 years old and has an impressive pedigree. His father, Jackie, was the 2005 National Hotrod Racing Association Champion.
“For as long as I can remember my dad has been my role model,” Jones said. “I look up to him in every way. He’s been my hero from day one.”
It’s been nearly 10 years, but Jones says his biggest moment in racing came when he was just 16 years old, in 2006. Jones lined up in a processional race at Texas Motor Place in Ennis and defeated every other contestant on the field–including his reigning champion father. Jones’ father still races today, now in his 36th year, all while using the same race car.
“Ennis was my first $10,000 win,” Jones said. “To beat my father, who was the champion, was one of the best moments of my life.”
He adopted the nick name “Bird” when he was 16.
“I’m six foot tall and over 200 pounds,” he said. “They called me Big Bird, and it stuck. Now, it’s changed into just “Bird.”
While Jones broke into racing on the track, he has transitioned to a newer “street racing” style that some traditionalist racers don’t identify with. Jones says some cities issue permits for street racing and dispatch police for safety.
“I make sure everything is done legally,” he said.
His reputation in street racing is catching the attention of the people that make the Street Outlaws show. Jones began making a name for himself in the scene after beating some of its biggest names, including three racers that have made appearances on the show. After he defeated the previously unbeaten Kye Kelley, one of the guys from Street Outlaws tagged Jones in a post on social media and a conversation began.
On the post, a tentative plan was made to “eat, talk some friendly smack, and find a dark road somewhere and pass some money around!”
If the meeting takes place, there will probably be cameras rolling for the show as well. Jones hopes that becomes a reality.
“Being on Street Outlaws is a big goal of mine right now,” he said.
And while Jones has accomplished a lot in the racing world, he says he couldn’t have done any of it without the help of his close-knit family.
His mom, Lynn, is with him at every finish line and “is always there to get whatever (car) part I need.” He gives her credit for being the woman behind the scenes, registering him for races online and booking hotels.
His aunt and uncle Rhonda and Less Smith have also contributed in a big way, giving him an F350 to haul the racing equipment.
“I couldn’t be doing this without them,” he said.
He also gives credit to his brother, Aaron. “He’s always in the shop to build anything I need. Who else will be there at 1 a.m. the night of a race to help me out?”