Jul

20

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 20, 2016

IMG_1171 group finding pokemon
By Erik Walsh
Monitor Staff Writer
CEDAR CREEK LAKE–There has been a huge buzz the past couple of weeks about Pokémon GO, a new mobile app that has kids (and adults!) glued to their phones and out on the streets looking for their favorite digital mini monsters.
The game is a free to play ap that can be downloaded from iTunes or Google Play. The game’s genre technically fits as a location-based augmented reality multiplayer online mobile game.
In plain English that means the application uses the player’s GPS signal to track their location on a stylized Google map as the game board. As the player moves around in the real world, so does its avatar in the game. Along the way players can take breaks at Pokéstops – which are often historical markers or landmarks in the real world – to refill on essential Pokémon catching materials. To interact with the Pokémon, players need to walk to a specific location and view the game through the phone display with the game’s battle sequence as an overlay. If the player can capture the creature with their stash of Pokéballs, the little creature is added to their collection.
The next question some may have is what the heck is a Pokémon? For starters a Pokémon is just a miniature digital animal that lives in different locations depending on what type of Pokémon it is. Just like you will only find a fish in water, some Pokémon tend to dwell near rivers or lakes. Likewise, fire Pokémon are more often found near gas stations. Additionally, spooky Pokémon are much more likely to come out at night. Two of the most wanted Pokémon are Eevee (left) and Pikichu (above).
So far the game has been a massive hit, averaging nearly 10 million active users every day since its launch July 6, and has been downloaded on over 10 percent of all Android phones. While the game is entirely free to play, it makes money from optional micro transactions that can give players additional Pokéballs, earn experience points faster or cast lures which attract Pokémon to the area.
Pokémon GO has a fairly large community around Cedar Creek Lake and especially Athens. According to the East Texas Pokémon GO Facebook page, popular spots for Pokémon hunting around Cedar Creek Lake include the Walmart in Gun Barrel City and Tom Finley Park. There are even more popular spots in Athens. Trinity Valley Community College, the courthouse square downtown, East Texas Arboretum and the Athens Cemetery are all frequented. According to the page, First United Methodist Church is offering free Pokémon lures during a weekly Pokemon GO social gathering each Sunday evening from 7-9 p.m. The East Texas Pokémon Go Facebook page has over 200 members.

Jul

20

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 20, 2016

Jose Manuel Rico-Gama
Jonna Lenice Heifner
Monitor Staff Reports
HENDERSON COUNTY–Henderson County Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Investigator Kay Langford arrested Jose Rico-Gama for possession of suspected methamphetamines on Thursday July 14.
The search warrant was issued by Judge Randy Daniel.
A team of Henderson County deputies and Athens Police detectives descended on the home.
Henderson County Sheriff Botie Hillhouse, Major Bryan Tower, Lt. David Faught, Investigator Kay Langford, Investigator Brad Beddingfield, Josh Rickman, Billy Valentine, Wick Gabbard, Jeromy Rose, Robert Powers, Jessica Halbert and Deputy Elsa Morris were on scene for the County.
Athens Police Detectives James Bonnette and Adam Parkins assisted with the investigation.
All officers executed the search warrant at a residence on Laird Lane in Athens and located suspected methamphetamine inside the residence.
Rico-Gama was found to be in possession of suspected methamphetamine. Several other individuals were in the home.
Suspect Jonna Heifner was there and was arrested for outstanding warrants.
“We are working hard getting drug dealers and users off the streets,” Hillhouse said. “My staff is doing an excellent job and working with other agencies to accomplish our goals.”

Jul

20

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 20, 2016

By Ryan Moulds
Monitor Sports Writer
ATHENS– Kris Baumann has announced his resignation as head men’s basketball coach/associate athletic director at Trinity Valley Community College. Baumann has accepted a position as assistant coach on the men’s basketball staff at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP).
“I’ve been coaching 17 years in junior college basketball and Trinity Valley is by far the best job I’ve ever had,” Baumann said. “It’s difficult to leave a place this special. “What sets this place apart from others is the people who work at the college, our fan base and the community. It truly is a special place.”
Baumann leaves after a four-year tenure at TVCC in which the Cardinals posted a 110-26 record. Baumann, owner of a 280-146 career record, guided the Cardinals to the national tournament in each of his last three seasons, claiming their first Region XIV championship since 1999 this past season.
In addition to claiming the regional title in the 2015-16 season, the Cardinals were an unprecedented 19-0 in conference play and were ranked No. 1 in the NJCAA the second half of the season. The Cardinals, who own a 33-game conference winning streak, also matched a school record for wins in a season, going 33-2.
During Baumann’s tenure, the Cardinals reached the Elite 8 in 2015 and the Sweet 16 in 2014 and 2016. The Cardinals were the No. 1 seed at the tournament this past season.
Prior to his arrival at TVCC in the summer of 2012, Baumann spent six seasons at Garden City Community College in Kansas. He was 120-75 at Garden City, where his 2009 squad advanced to the national tournament and finished sixth.
He also served three years as head coach at Lamar Community College and stints as an assistant coach at Chipola Junior College and Tallahassee Community College.
Baumann attended and played at the University of Idaho, where he became one of the top three-point shooters in school history. He was voted team captain both his junior and senior seasons and received the prestigious Ronald White Award.
He received his bachelor’s degree in general studies from the University of Idaho and Masters of Administration and sports management from Columbia Southern University.
UTEP is under the leadership of head coach Tim Floyd who will be entering his seventh season with the team. UTEP finished with a 19-14 record last season and was 10-8 in conference play. They finished sixth in Conference-USA.
Baumann’s junior college signees went on to play at Auburn (Archie Miaway), Charlotte (JC Washington), Cincinnati (Kareem Johnson and Octavius Ellis), East Carolina (Corey Farmer and Clarence Williams), Fresno State (Quinton Hosley), Gonzaga (Abdullahi Kuso), Iowa State (Jhaustin Thomas), Kansas State (Janerio Spurlock), Louisiana Tech (Marcelle Davis, Lavelle Felton and Michael Wilder), Memphis (Geron Johnson), Middle Tennessee (Trevor Ottley), New Mexico State (Supo Jegede), North Texas (Richard Thomas), Purdue (Jon Octeus), Stephen F. Austin (Leon Gilmore), Texas A&M (LaKeith Blanks), UAB (Will Campbell), UCF (Lavelle Payne) and Wyoming (Thomas Manzano), among numerous Division I schools.