Jul

23

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 23, 2015

Flag Rally-beginning-better

By 2 p.m. Sunday more than 100 vehicles had gathered in the parking lot of the Heritage Center in Gun Barrel City for a rally to uphold the value of the Confederate flag, alongside the American flag, Texas Lone Star and Texas Confederate flag for an unescorted parade of vehicles to Athens. Organizers Susan Paul and Billy Wayne Roundtree Jr. told The Monitor they are not racists. “If a few can protest to take the Confederate flag down, a few of us can stand up to keep it flying. It will come down in Texas if we don’t stand up for it,” they agreed. Vehicles, mostly trucks, streamed their way along State Highway 334 through Gun Barrel City on their way to U.S. Highway 175 and then onto the Loop around Athens in a show of solidarity and to create a positive image of the proud symbol of southern states risen in secession from a union perceived as destroying a way of life valued by an agrarian society. A burgeoning industrial north was viewed as gaining more and more control over the economy in the mid-19th century. INSETS: Excitement builds as the time draws near to hit the road. Sixteen years after statehood, Texas declared its secession from the United States of America Feb. 1, 1861. After replacing its governor, Sam Houston, when he refused to take an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy, Texas joined the Confederate States on March 2, 1861. Some Texan military units fought in the Civil War east of the Mississippi River. But for the most part, Texas supplied soldiers and horses for Confederate forces until a blockade in mid-1863 by Union gunboats on the Mississippi River effectively stopped large transfers of men, horses and cattle. In addition, blockades of gulf ports in Galveston and elsewhere also halted cotton crops from getting to market.

Jul

23

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 23, 2015

Achorn

By Erik Walsh
Monitor Sports Editor
MABANK–Coaches often get into their profession because of a combined passion for sports and helping kids. This is no different for Mabank’s new Head Softball Coach, Brent Achorn.
Achorn spent 11 years in law enforcement as a police officer before he decided the best way to impact the lives of young people was to become a coach and teacher.
“I got tired of seeing all the crimes committed against kids,” Achorn told The Monitor. “I had always been a sports person so I decided I could affect more lives as a coach.”
At the time, Achorn was assigned to the Stephenville police force. He enrolled at Tarleton State University and eventually became the graduate assistant and helped with the football team.
Now, 10 years later, he finds himself in Mabank, teaching U.S. history after nearly getting hired for the same job in Athens.
“I originally applied to the Athens position,” Achorn said. “I was among the two finalists for the job, but they couldn’t get my teaching field lined up with their needs, so I was left looking for other positions throughout Texas.”
That’s when Mabank Athletic Director Tracy Carter got a call from Athens Athletic Director Paul Essary, who was impressed with Achorn and recommended Mabank’s open softball position to Achorn. The rest, they say, is history.
“I got the call from Coach Carter on the way home from an interview in Wichita Falls,” Achorn said. “I’m excited about coaching in Mabank because I get to keep teaching U.S. history and inherit a group of hungry girls that are excited to play softball.”
Achorn brings 10 years of head softball coaching experience to Mabank after spending time at Granbury, Fossil Ridge and Abilene high schools. In his initial season at Fossil Ridge, he helped bring the team to the playoffs for the first time in 10 years. Achorn will also chip in coaching volleyball as the freshman coach in Mabank. He has six years of volleyball coaching experience.
Now Achorn and his wife are making the transition to Mabank. “We just got a contract on a house last weekend,” he said. “I am excited to meet the girls and their parents.”

Jul

23

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 23, 2015

Picture Folder Bynum Obit

My loving husband of 49 years, Thomas Brady Bynum, is now with his Heavenly Father. He passed away July 4, 2015, at Trinity Mother Frances hospital in Tyler.
Visitation begins at 11 a.m. followed by a memorial service for Tom at 1 p.m. Saturday, July 25, at Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home in Mabank.
He will be honored with a Navy Veterans ceremony, Mason’s service, and a eulogy and hymn by his nephew, Jesse Bynum.
Tom served in the U.S. Navy from 1960 to 1964. He was involved in the early stages of the Vietnam war on the USS Bennington.
We were married in East Troy, Wis., Feb. 12, 1966, and lived in East Troy and Delavan, Wis., for 21 years. He was active in the Delavan Chapter of the Jaycees and served as president. 
Tom worked at the General Motors (GM) plant in Janesville, Wis., for 10 years then transferred to the Fort Wayne, Ind., GM assembly plant, working for an additional 20 years.
After 30 years at General Motors, he retired to Mabank, in 2007.
He became a member of the Mason’s Roddy Lodge, Mabank in 2010 and served as Master of the lodge in 2013, He was also a member of the Mason lodge in Eustace. He was a member of the American Legion in Wisconsin, Indiana and Texas.    
Tom was born Sept. 4 1943, in Okemah, Okla.
He is survived by his wife, Ruth Gillihan Bynum, sisters Lois Bynum Abourzk, Rita Evans, Derry (James), Carol Evans, Haggard (Larry).
He was proceeded in death by his father, Jess Bynum, mother Nellie Holt Bynum Evans, stepfather, Olen C. Evans, brothers Virgil, Levie, John and Ray Bynum, John Calvin (Jake) and David Evans, sisters Ruth Bynum, Greenlee Louwana Bynum Foster, Sharon Evans, Bernard and Patricia Evans Anderson.
There are many nieces, nephews and extended family and friends who mourn his passing.