Apr

05

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : April 5, 2017


Monitor Staff Reports
GUN BARREL CITY–Gun Barrel City Police are still searching for a suspected armed robber who broke into a residence in the Willowwood Subdivision early Monday and held three hostages at gun point.
At around 5 a.m. Monday, April 3, Timothy Berry forcefully entered a residence on Willowwood Drive, where his estranged wife had been staying, according to a press release. 41-year-old Berry held his wife, the homeowner and the homeowner’s 10-year-old son hostage for approximately 1 1/2 hours. After distracting their captor, the hostages fled the residence and alerted police.
Berry is described as a Caucasian male, 5-10, weighing 200 lbs. and thought to no longer be in Gun Barrel City.
“The subject is armed and dangerous. If seen, do not approach. Call 9-1-1, immediately,” states the press release. He is known to frequent areas around Tool, Seven Points and Scurry, it adds.
While in his custody, hostages told police that Berry confiscated their cell phones to prevent them from contacting police. After his hostages fled, Berry attempted to leave by driving one of the victim’s vehicles. However, he was unable to start the vehicle and fled on foot.
Responding officers searched the area but were unsuccessful in locating Berry.

Apr

05

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : April 5, 2017

Monitor Staff Reports
MALAKOFF–Henderson County Precinct 5 Justice of the Peace Tommy Barnett died Saturday, after an illness.
Based in Malakoff, Judge Barnett died at the age of 66, having served for about 10 years as judge. The funeral service was held Wednesday at the First Baptist Church in Malakoff.
Voters named Barnett to the J.P. position in 2006, when he defeated Lloyd Arthus by more than 500 votes to win the election. Barnett replaced longtime Pct. 5 Justice of the Peace Judy Newman, who had held the office since 1979.  
Barnett was the Vo-Ag teacher at Cross Roads ISD for 32 years and served as the high school principal for a time. On March 30, Cross Roads ISD trustees named the new Ag-Science building in his honor “The Tommy Barnett Ag Complex.”
Besides mentoring hundreds of ag-science students, Barnett was also known for his involvement with Senior Olympics and the local nursing homes.
He is survived ty is wife of 32 years, Dorothy Durham Barnett, three sisters and many nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, the family is asking for donations to the Tommy Barnett Scholarship Fund at the First State Bank of Malakoff.

Mar

31

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : March 31, 2017

By Denise York
Monitor Staff Writer
MABANK–Teachers, staff and community members filed into Mabank High School Auditorium March 23 to hear NewYork Times bestselling author and founder of OM (One Man) Foundation, Bonner Paddock speak.
But this was far from a “Look at me, aren’t I wonderful?” speech. And let’s face it, as the first person with Cerebral Palsy to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro and complete the Kona Ironman, he certainly has the bragging rights.
Instead, he spoke of the power of the human spirit to embrace love, to begin each day, each challenge with a smile and a hug instead of anger and fear. “No matter what your ‘dark places’ are.” Paddock is the first to admit that is not easy.
As a child growing up with Cerebral Palsy, a hidden disease, he knows firsthand what it means to be labeled, limited by others. So, how did he push past the scared, angry little boy to become the man he is today?
Paddock gave five steps to the audience. These steps, he said fit for everyone, no matter where they are in their journey or what they are facing:
1. Attitude.
The four major attitudes as he explained are pessimist, optimist, realist and delusional. Paddock calls himself an optimistic realist which as he explains it is realizing what is and hoping for the best. “Life is going to hand you challenges, that’s what life does but your attitude determines what you do with it. You have to find the pathway to hope”
2. Take off the masks. Everyone wears masks but until you take them off, you can’t be real and it incapacitates us. Paddock told the audience he was trapped by the mask of fear for the first 30 years of his life.
3. Hug yourself, learn to love yourself and respect yourself to get on the right track. Take care of yourself. Give hope, smile and hug people and share love. Focus on the beautiful things like smiles and hugs.
4. Find your Big Bird Listen to that person; love and trust that person. He references the character Big Bird from Sesame Street who was often the voice of reason and comfort for children on the show who were struggling with something or had questions. Everyone needs someone in their life like this. For Paddock, this was his father from whom he was estranged. The two have reconnected now and Paddock refers to his Dad as “his best friend.”
5. Cut your excuses and whines down to ten a day.
Eliminate the top three things you whine about every day. For Paddock, it was his feet that hurt the most that he stopped complaining about. Eliminating all the negative self-talk enabled him to go on when he thought he couldn’t.
Paddock credits the change in his life to his experience of knowing a little boy named Jake. Jake was only four and a half years old when he died in his sleep. Jake had cerebral palsy, but he was full of life and had a great sunny attitude. He became Paddock’s inspiration.
To meet Bonner Paddock is to meet a warm, caring man with a beautiful smile and a big hug. He has a heart for those with cerebral palsy and other disabilities, especially children. But his message is one of hope for all living the human experience. As he said in the beginning of his talk, “Who sets your limits?”
His book, “One More Step” is available at Amazon.com. For more information, visit OMF.org.