Dec

16

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : December 16, 2016

Special to The Monitor
KAUFMAN– Kaufman County Judge Bruce Wood announced Wednesday he is appointing Michael David Hunt to serve as Kaufman County Precinct 1 Commissioner.
The office winner, Greg Starek has declined to accept the office.
The swearing-in ceremony is set for 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017 at the Kaufman County Courthouse.
Wood accepted Starek’s declination of office, and notified the public that pursuant to Texas Law, Wood will appoint an individual to serve as Kaufman County Commissioner in Starek’s place, come Jan. 1, 2017.
Several applications and inquiries about serving have been received, Wood said.
He expressed his thanks to the residents of Precinct 1 who recommended various ones. Wood further stated his decision was a difficult task because he has known many of the applicants personally and professionaly, and considers many of them his personal friends.
After much careful consideration, Wood selected Hunt. “Mr. Hunt has an excellent background that qualifies him for the position,” Wood said. He believes Hunt will serve the residents of Precinct 1 in a professional and responsive manner. Hunt said he was excited about this challenge and has much to do between now and Jan. 1, 2017 when he will be sworn into office.

Dec

16

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : December 16, 2016

World War II and Korean War Army-Air Force Pilot John White (left) and U.S. Army Combat Engineer Carrol Young serve as parade grand marshals.

World War II and Korean War Army-Air Force Pilot John White (left) and U.S. Army Combat Engineer Carrol Young serve as parade grand marshals.

Special to The Monitor
GUN BARREL CITY–One of the two Grand Marshals of this year’s Gun Barrel City Christmas Parade is 86-year-old Korean War Veteran Carrol Elmo Young. (The other is John White. See the Dec. 8 issue of The Monitor to read about this military pilot.)
Born on April 04, 1930 in Cherokee County, Young enlisted in the U.S. Army at the age of 20. After training, he joined the Combat Engineers at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where he built baily bridges for troops to cross over rivers to North Korea. He received a Presidential Unit Citation and an expert rifle badge. After serving two years, he was given early discharge in 1952 because his father was dying of cancer and he, being the only son, was sent home to comfort and take care of his mother.
He met and married Billie Kathryn that same year. They had two daughters and a son. Carrol worked as a building contractor and constructed many houses. He also trained to become a pilot and purchased a Piper Cherokee 160. He and Billie enjoyed flying and visiting many states. They also got to travel overseas. 
Many years after retiring, they moved to Gun Barrel City, where he served as an Election Judge, P.O.A. president, delivered meals to shut-ins, and joined the Labor of Love building group, serving elderly homeowners so they would have a safe living environment. Carrol is very proud to have served so many people who needed food and help. He loves his country and was very proud to serve.

Dec

09

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : December 9, 2016

john-glenn-space

COLUMBUS, OHIO.–American space hero and longtime Ohio U.S. senator John Glenn died Thursday at the age of 95. He had been hospitalized for more than a week at the James Cancer Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.
Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth in a flight lasting just five hours aboard the Friendship 7 capsule in 1962. He was 40 years old for that historic flight on Feb. 20, 1962 from Cape Canaveral.
He was 77 years old at the time he became the oldest space traveler. He spent nine days aboard the space shuttle Discovery.
NASA tailored a series of geriatric-reaction experiments to create a scientific purpose for Glenn’s mission, but there was more to it than that: a revival of the excitement of the earliest days of the space race, a public relations bonanza and the gift of a lifetime.
“America owed John Glenn a second flight,” NASA Administrator Dan Goldin said.
A news conference from space in 1998 said, “To look out at this kind of creation out here and not believe in God is to me impossible.”
However, Glenn’s passion for flight took hold on him from his youth, being lived out as a fighter and test pilot for the U.S. Marine Corp. in World War II and Korea racking up 149 combat missions. He continued to pilot his own plane until the age of 90.
As a test pilot, he broke aviation records.
Glenn’s public life began when he broke the transcontinental airspeed record, bursting from Los Angeles to New York City in three hours, 23 minutes and 8 seconds. With his Crusader averaging 725 mph, the 1957 flight proved the jet could endure stress when pushed to maximum speeds over long distances.
In New York, he got a hero’s welcome — his first tickertape parade. He got another after his flight on Friendship 7.
That mission also introduced Glenn to politics. He addressed a joint session of Congress, and dined at the White House. He became friends with President Kennedy and ally and friend of his brother, Robert. The Kennedys urged him to enter politics, and after a difficult few starts he did.
Glenn spent 24 years in the U.S. Senate, representing Ohio longer than any other senator in the state’s history. He announced his impending retirement in 1997, 35 years to the day after he became the first American in orbit, saying, “There is still no cure for the common birthday.”
Glenn joked he was envious of a fellow astronaut and Ohioan: Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon.
“I’ve been very fortunate to have a lot of great experiences in my life and I’m thankful for them,” he said in 2012.
In 1943, Glenn married his childhood sweetheart, Anna Margaret Castor. They met when they were toddlers, and when she had mumps as a teenager, he came to her house, cut a hole in her bedroom window screen, and passed her a radio to keep her company, a friend recounted.
“I don’t remember the first time I told Annie I loved her, or the first time she told me,” Glenn would write in his memoir. “It was just something we both knew.” He bought her a diamond engagement ring in 1942 for $125. It’s never been replaced.
They had two children, Carolyn and John David.
He and his wife, Annie, split their later years between Washington and Columbus. Both served as trustees at their alma mater, Muskingum College. Glenn spent time promoting the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at Ohio State University, which also houses an archive of his private papers and photographs.