May

18

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 18, 2014

Dr. Doug Curran

Dr. Doug Curran


Special to The Monitor
ATHENS–The Henderson County Democratic Women’s Club’s monthly meeting and luncheon is at 11 a.m. Tuesday, May 20, at Hunan’s Restaurant on Robbins Road in Athens and will include a presentation by Dr. Doug Curran concerning the Affordable Health Care Act.
Curran is a much loved and highly respected family care physician who has been practicing medicine in Athens since 1979.
“Health Care in America costs too much, and the Affordable Care Act is the beginning of changing how we deliver medicine. I think it is going to change a whole lot over the next few years. I hope people can see it as a beginning. The good parts of it, we need to keep and the bad parts, we need to fix,” Curran said.
A limited number of seats for non-members will be available to those individuals who would like to hear Curran’s presentation and/or ask questions concerning the new healthcare law.
There is no charge for attending the meeting. Lunch is on you.

May

18

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 18, 2014

Monitor Photo/Robyn Wheeler April Petty’s staff includes (front row, from left) stylist Joshua Fluker, receptionist Diana Hathcock, stylist Starla Stone, Petty, nail technician Brenda Lee, stylist Nathan King, (back row, from left) stylist Carrie Samford and stylist Karen Eberlein.

Monitor Photo/Robyn Wheeler
April Petty’s staff includes (front row, from left) stylist Joshua Fluker, receptionist Diana Hathcock, stylist Starla Stone, Petty, nail technician Brenda Lee, stylist Nathan King, (back row, from left) stylist Carrie Samford and stylist Karen Eberlein.

An upscale salon with a down-to-earth attitude

By Robyn Wheeler
Monitor Staff Writer

GUN BARREL CITY–April Petty’s Salon & Spa began in 2013 by owner April Petty in a small space inside the Family Fitness at the corner of SH 198 and SH 334.
“We moved to our new location on Main St., next to Hector’s Restaurant last month because it is a more convenient location for our customers, and more spacious and easier to find,” Petty said.
Petty needs the extra space because her full-service salon offers not only haircuts, perms and highlights for men, women and children, but also manicures, pedicures, a variety of massages, aromatherapy, eyelash extensions and reflexology.
“Our mission is to offer our clients all the services they need in one convenient location. We are an upscale salon with a down-to-earth attitude,” Petty said.
Petty employs five stylists including Nathan King, Starla Stone, Joshua Fluker, Carrie Samford and Karen Eberlein as well as nail tech Brenda Lee, massage therapist Melinda Claiborn, LMT, and receptionist Diana Hathcock.
Petty graduated Metroplex Beauty School of Gun Barrel City in 1996.
King is a graduate of Paul Mitchell in California and a 2009 graduate of the Aveda Institute in San Antonio.
Fluker is a 2008 graduate of TONI&GUY Academy and Samford is a 2013 graduate of Trinity Valley Community College in Athens.
Lee owned Classy Nail, Tanning and Hair of Gun Barrel City before retiring and is now a part-time nail tech at April Petty’s Salon & Spa.
Claiborn performs detox, prenatal, reflex, stone, Swedish and trigger massage by appointment only. For an appointment, call Claiborn at (903) 603-8888.
April Petty’s Salon & Spa is located at 1918 W. Main St. in Gun Barrel City and open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Early and late appointments, and “on location” services for special events are available.
April Petty’s Salon & Spa can be reached at (903) 887-6096.

Apr

27

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : April 27, 2014

Monitor Photo/Pearl Cantrell Two young men from Biosecure Alpaca Shearing operation out of Mineola shear a blanket portion from one of 33 alpacas at Trinity Ridge ranch west of Seven Points.

Monitor Photo/Pearl Cantrell
Two young men from Biosecure Alpaca Shearing operation out of Mineola shear a blanket portion from one of 33 alpacas at Trinity Ridge ranch west of Seven Points.


By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer

CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Janet and Steve Hancock of Trinity Ridge Alpacas and fiber studio gathered their small, wet herd of 33 alpacas into the barn early April 6 and hoped their wool would be dry by the next morning when shearers from Mineola were scheduled to come.
“We kept the fans running all night,” Janet told The Monitor the day after a day-long downpour across East Texas.
She expects to harvest about 150 pounds of one of the world’s finest and most luxurious natural fibers.
Alpaca fiber is warmer, stronger, lighter, and more resilient than sheep’s wool, and is recognized by the worldwide fiber market in 22 natural colors, making alpacas the most colorful animals on the earth!
It also takes and retains dyes very well. The natural colors of alpaca can also be blended producing yet other colors.
Janet has been attracted to the South American camelid from the very start because of its unique and beautiful fiber.
“Our whole focus was the fiber to begin with,” she said.
She operates a fiber studio out of her home out on Farm-to-Market 85 to share her craft and market the fiber, which remains categorized by the name of the animal it came from.
She and her husband have been raising alpacas for the past 13 years, and established a ranch in the area in 2007.
Shearing begins with the animal’s with the whitest wool and progresses to the darkest, she explained. Each is sorted by color and animal.
Some will be sent away for processing, some she will process herself and others will be marketed as raw fiber.
The process includes many steps, but today it is all about the shearing. Each animal is stretched out on padded, washable mat with front and back feet secured.
Shearers first check and clip the eight toenails, two on each foot. Then the shearing begins with the “blanket” or mid section, which is shorn in one big piece weighing up to four and a half pounds. The tail and back area follow, then the back legs, neck and front legs. The teeth are also evened up with a grinder, which is done last.
The shearers work carefully, methodically and quickly. Most the animals take the shearing in stride, with nary a word of complaint, while some of the younger animals seem to scream and complain the entire time, which takes less than 10 minutes per alpaca.
The Hancocks have several friends on hand to assist with the collection of the sheared material into pre-labled clear, plastic bags.
A primary shearer does the first shave, then a cleanup shearer takes over. In this way, two animals are going through the process at a time.
After the cleanup, the animal goes back into its halter and is released back to standing. The ranch staff takes over, guiding the alpaca onto a scale for weighing. This step is important in determining the amount of medication needed for de-worming and other administrations over the next several months.
Lastly, the alpaca is led into the pasture feeling loads lighter and looking a little naked, but nice.
Janet is finalizing her application to trademark her fiber products under the label Paca-Perfect.
“We are one of the few alpaca ranches that can show you how to take the raw fiber from fleece to finished products,” Janet explains. In addition to selling quality fiber products, she teaches various fiber arts classes.
She offers instruction, as well as spinning and weaving equipment.
To learn more, call her at (972) 877-5060. The ranch is located at 33064 FM 85 Kemp, TX 75143-6430.

More photos from this event can be found in the Sunday, April 27, 2014 issue of The Monitor.