Jan

11

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : January 11, 2015

Special to The Monitor
WILLS POINT–The Talent Box, Inc., productions is holding auditions for roles in “On Golden Pond,” at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 25, and 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26.
Ernest Thompson wrote the script and Kevin Gibbs of Wills Point will direct this production.
Auditions are open for one male and one female from 50 to 60 years old, one male and one female mid-20s to 30s and one male from 13 to 16 years of age.
Rehearsals will be set by the director.
Production dates are Friday-Sunday, March 27-29 and Friday-Saturday, April 3-4.
The plot focuses on aging couple Ethel and Norman Thayer, who spend each summer at their home on a lake called Golden Pond.
During the year the story takes place, they are visited by their daughter, Chelsea, and her fiance’ and his son.
The play explores the often turbulent relationship the young woman shared with her father while growing up, and the difficulties faced by a couple in the twilight years of a long marriage.
For additional information, call the theater at (903) 873-8945. Leave your name and telephone number and someone will return your call.
The Talent Box is located at 244 N. 4th Street in Wills Point.

Jan

04

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : January 4, 2015

Courtesy Photo Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Group leader Jean Everett (left) visits with Hale Law Firm Elder Care Coordinator Debbie Jones at the December meeting at the Arabella Clubhouse in Athens.

Courtesy Photo
Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Group leader Jean Everett (left) visits with Hale Law Firm Elder Care Coordinator Debbie Jones at the December meeting at the Arabella Clubhouse in Athens.


Special to The Monitor
ATHENS–The Parkinson’s Disease Awareness group will meet at 1 p.m. Jan. 8 at the Arabella Clubhouse located at 413 Gibson Road in Athens.
The meetings are held the second Thursday of the month but call if unsure especially during bad weather.
The November meeting covered physical therapy presented by Stephanie Sypert of Eustace. She told about the importance of daily exercise and which exercises worked best for those suffering from Parkinson’s.
The December meeting speaker was Debbie Jones, Elder Care Coordinator from the Hale Law Firm. Debbie presented a program on the elder care legal system and answered a few questions.
If you are suffering from Parkinson’s or are a caregiver, family or friend needing more information on this incurable disease, please attend this meeting.
Some symptoms of Parkinson’s include tremor, slow movement, stiffness, postural instability, freezing gait or speech, hallucinations, shrinkage of handwriting, trouble swallowing, arm swing, constipation, urinary urgency, excessive saliva and dementia.
In learning more about this disease, you are able to help your loved one or friend to hopefully live a better life. All we can do now is pray for a cure.
For more information, call Jean Everett at (903) 681-4167.

Jan

01

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : January 1, 2015

Courtesy Photo The aftermath of a Dec. 9, 2014 water ground storage tank collapse at the Tool Water Plant. About 130,000 gallons of water escaped, “like a tsunami” when a rivet popped, triggering a chain reaction. “It could have resulted in loss of life. We were very lucky,” General Manager Tony Ciardo said. “But we can change this catastrophe into an opportunity.”

Courtesy Photo
The aftermath of a Dec. 9, 2014 water ground storage tank collapse at the Tool Water Plant. About 130,000 gallons of water escaped, “like a tsunami” when a rivet popped, triggering a chain reaction. “It could have resulted in loss of life. We were very lucky,” General Manager Tony Ciardo said. “But we can change this catastrophe into an opportunity.”


By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer

TOOL–West Cedar Creek Municipal Utility District directors approved the installation of two larger, better protected water ground storage tanks and pump in the wake of a tank collapse in December.
The new purchase will increase water storage capacity to 2 million gallons at the Tool water plant and add 75 years to the new tanks’ 25-year life-span.
While no firm estimates on the costs were known during the utility’s Dec. 22 meeting, directors agreed to a high guess of $650,000 provided by general manager Tony Ciardo.
“Insurance will cover some of it, don’t know how much,” Ciardo said. “We’ve got the money (up to $750,000) to do it.”
On Dec. 9, 2014 the water plant’s 150,000-gallon water storage tank collapsed, losing an estimated 130,000 gallons of treated water. “We were lucky no one was hurt or killed,” Ciardo said. Four employees could have been in jeopardy, he added.
“I’ve never seen a tank fail the way this one did,” he added. “We could have had four funerals. We were lucky.”
The tank was near the end of its life-span, in service for 23 years. “It popped one bolt and it was gone,” Ciardo said. “It was very unusual.”
Ciardo outlined two ways to replace the storage facility to directors, but recommended choosing the one with the higher price tag because it would be of greatest savings to the district over the long haul. Directors agreed unanimously with the recommendation after having both alternatives fully explained and asking a number of questions.
Directors present included Jim Scrimshire, Bruce Thurston, Eldon Cox, Wanda Smith and David Lewis, overseen by board president Clifton Smith.
Currently, water is being delivered to customers, including the meters in Kemp through the Tolosa Water Plant, Ciardo said.
While the Tool plant is off-line, Ciardo said the motors are being reworked, drain valves replaced and a second water tank being disinfected.
“The Tolosa plant is running at half capacity under tight pressure in order to feed the whole system with much of the water coming from the elevated tower in Seven Points,” he explained.
“It’s difficult but as long as temperatures don’t get below 10 degrees Celsius, we will still be able to make water,” he said.
“But we have to take action really quickly,” Ciardo said, “because the other tank needs to be taken out of service.”
The tank that failed rose to a height of 24 feet. Ciardo recommended adding another eight feet to increase to 32 feet high, which adds another 50,000 gallons. A second tank holds 100,000 gallons.
The upgrade includes installing baffling sheets to the interior of both tanks to keep water moving throughout the tank, the way people snake through an attraction line at a theme park. Baffling will help the plant solve a problem it has had all year with the off-gassing, affecting the disinfectant levels. A third pump will also have to be added, which was approved.
All else, the location, concrete base, etc., may remain the same, except for the addition of a few valves to plumb in the pump and an additional bucket.
An extra pump will make it easier for the plant to vary the rate of flows, depending on water usage, which is down now.
A final element to be added is Cathodic Protection (CP), a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface by making it the cathode of an electrochemical cell. A simple method of protection connects protected metal to a more easily corroded “sacrificial metal” to act as the anode. The sacrificial metal then corrodes instead of the protected metal.
Directors had to choose either a galvanized bolted tank (like the one that failed) or a welded tank. They went with the welded tank and also opted for CP, which will extend the life of the tank to 100 years, they heard.
A welded tank could be on site in six weeks, Ciardo said.