Aug

17

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 17, 2014

Monitor Photo/Summer Simpson Elaborate costumes are all part of the fun, but may have contributed to a young girl falling during the parade and being run over by one wheel of a trailer.

Monitor Photo/Summer Simpson
Elaborate costumes are all part of the fun, but may have contributed to a young girl falling during the parade and being run over by one wheel of a trailer.


By David Webb
Monitor Correspondent

EUSTACE–The Eustace City Council continued discussion of a new parade ordinance designed to promote public safety at an Aug. 7 meeting.
The council tabled the ordinance until next month to incorporate new ideas. Mayor Elicia Sanders and Chief of Police Ken Holder are collaborating on a draft of the ordinance.
The proposed rule prohibits the throwing of any items, including gum, beads, paper or any other article from floats, vehicles or people on horseback. No one will be allowed to enter or exit floats, vehicles or other moving objects once the parade begins. It further defines a parade as any procession of people, animals or vehicles on public streets or alleys.
Any person or organization planning a parade must apply for a permit at Eustace City Hall and await approval or denial by the mayor or the mayor’s representative.
In other action, the council:
• learned from the mayor that repairs to the City Hall roof are faulty, and that Sun Roofing had not returned phone calls about honoring the warranty. Sanders said the city would no longer do business with Sun Roofing.
• approved city employee life insurance through Kansas City Life, and vision and dental coverage with United Healthcare. Last month, the council approved medical services insurance with Blue Cross Blue Shield.
• set 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20 for a presentation about a 2012 Texas Community Development Block planning grant of $32,565 for local city improvements to include maps, streets, zoning recommendations, parks and utilities. Public Management out of Cleveland will make the presentation.
• tabled consideration of the 2014-2015 fiscal year budget until next month.

Aug

14

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 14, 2014

Courtesy Photo Governor, a one-eyed brown tabby stub-tailed Manx kitten (left) and her sister, Hope, a dilute torti tailless (rumpy) Manx will be available for adoption from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16 at the Love Your Cat Adoption Center located at T-Bar-T Farm Supply at 2836 East U.S. Highway 175 just East of SH 34, in Kaufman.

Courtesy Photo
Governor, a one-eyed brown tabby stub-tailed Manx kitten (left) and her sister, Hope, a dilute torti tailless (rumpy) Manx.

Adopt a cat or dog at the “Empty the Shelter” event

Special to The Monitor
TOOL–The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake (HSCCL) is waiving adoption fees during its “Empty the Shelter” event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16, sponsored by NBC5 in Dallas.
Regular adoption fees are $85 for cats and kittens, $90 for dogs and $100 for puppies.
The Humane Society of Cedar Creek Lake (HSCCL) is a private, non-profit 501(c)3 organization serving the animals and people of Kaufman and Henderson counties.
Their mission is to promote the humane treatment of animals through care, education and advocacy.
The humane society is more than 30 years old and provides shelter, food and care to more than 3,500 animals each year.
HSCCL is located at 10200 CR 2043 in Tool, 100 yards south of the intersection of SH 274 and Arnold Hills Road.
The intersection is south of Brookshires in Seven Points and north of McDade’s Nursery in Tool.
For more information or to volunteer, call (903) 432-3422.

Aug

07

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : August 7, 2014

Believe and See operates mobile cataract clinic in Africa

Courtesy Photo ETMC officials announce they are donating an ambulance unit to  Believe and See to help doctors perform cataract surgeries in The Republic of Togo in West Central Africa. The ambulance will  be shipped later this year.

Courtesy Photo
ETMC officials announce they are donating an ambulance unit to Believe and See to help doctors perform cataract surgeries in The Republic of Togo in West Central Africa. The ambulance will be shipped later this year.


Special to The Montior
CEDAR CREEK LAKE–ETMC is donating an ambulance unit to Believe and See, an organization founded by Tyler resident Lewis Swann.
The ambulance will travel on a ship to The Republic of Togo in West Central Africa later this year.
Believe and See restores sight with cataract surgeries to 100 people each month in remote villages and provides blindness prevention education, agriculture training and spiritual support.
“We are so pleased ETMC is able to provide one of our ambulance units to assist people in Africa and provide a mobile cataract clinic to rural areas,” ETMC President and Chief Executive Officer Elmer G. Ellis said.
“Our teal and white ambulances are seen in East Texas, Waco and Pasadena, and now you will find one of our units on the roads in Togo.”
“This donation of a former EMS unit represents a unique opportunity for ETMC to impact healthcare half-way around the world.”
“Togo has 30,000 children and adults blinded by cataracts,” Swann said.
“Malnutrition, contaminated water and the lack of education contribute to the development of cataracts. Half of the blind live too far from a doctor to receive medical care,” he added.
“This gift of an ambulance from ETMC will be very helpful to our organization in being able to bring Believe and See’s mobile cataract clinic to villages all over the country.”
“This ambulance was no longer in service, and we were able to prepare the unit and get it ready for this journey to Africa,” ETMC EMS Vice President Ron Schwartz said.
“Our team is thrilled to be part of this exciting mission to bring sight for the people of Togo,” he added.
According to the National Eye Institute, a cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision.
Most cataracts are related to aging and researchers suspect smoking, alcohol, diabetes and prolonged exposure to sunlight may contribute to its development.
Cataracts can affect a person’s vision by reducing the sharpness of the image reaching the retina or creating a cloudy area of the lens that makes vision become blurry.
Cataracts can be treated with surgery by replacing the cloudy lens with an artificial lens. Other treatments include new eyeglasses, anti-glare sunglasses or magnifying lenses.
“The mobile unit, provided by ETMC, will travel thousands of miles each year taking surgeons to remote villages to deliver the gift of vision,” Swann said.
“It’s an amazing outreach to be able to remove cataracts and have a mother see her child for the first time or a young child be able to see his family and community. Some of the adults have not seen anything in decades and in Togo, blindless can make it difficult to survive,” Swann added.
ETMC team members and some of their church congregations donated more than 400 pairs of sunglasses for patients to wear after the surgery.