May

08

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : May 8, 2014

Monitor Photo/Ronald Wheeler Perot Museum Director of Corporate Giving Christina Cavalier speaks to Rotary Club members at the May 2 meeting at the Cedar Creek Country Club.

Monitor Photo/Ronald Wheeler
Perot Museum Director of Corporate Giving Christina Cavalier speaks to Rotary Club members at the May 2 meeting at the Cedar Creek Country Club.

Motion lab, mind control activities, T-rex races and more

By Robyn Wheeler
Monitor Staff Writer
KEMP–Rotary Club of Cedar Creek Lake members heard Perot Museum of Nature and Science Director of Corporate Giving Christina Cavalier speak about the many displays and activities at the museum May 2.
“The Perot Museum is 85,000 square feet and contains 11 exhibition halls and one traveling hall,” Cavalier said.
“Our paleontologist found two new species of dinosaurs in Alaska. The museum now displays a 35-foot Malawisaurus fossil,” Cavalier added.
In addition to a never-seen before dinosaur, the five-floor museum features a 3-D theater, a dino dig for children 5 and under and a sports hall with a motion lab allowing visitors to race a T-rex against professional athletes.
Also of interest is the Dynamic Earth Hall that has an earthquake shake table, Being Human Hall and Energy Hall.
“I could get lost in the Energy Hall. I learn something new every time I go in there,” Cavalier said.
Perot Museum also features a mind control simulator where visitors can move Ping Pong balls with their brain waves and have an opportunity to control a robot.
Adults Only programs are available as well, giving grown-ups a themed night out on the town. Adult programs feature a cash bar, innovative experiments and dynamic performances.
The fun doesn’t stop there. The Perot Museum also offers workshops for Brownies and Girl Scouts and homeschools, as well as sleepovers, summer camps and a Night at the Museum.
The Perot Museum is the result of merging the Science Place, Dallas Children’s Museum and the Dallas Museum of Natural History together.
The museum has a great view of the downtown Dallas skyline and is open Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Memberships are available.
For more information, go to www.perotmuseum.-org.
In other news, Rotarians:
• awarded Mabank Independent School District Education Foundation $2,000, accepted by board member Deborah Brendel.
Brendel said MISD has a diverse community of more than 3,600 students with 2,600 receiving free lunches.
“Through this grant we can provide programs to help students be successful in the workplace, breaking the cycle of poverty,” Brendel said.
• Kemp ISD Education Foundation was also awarded a $2,000 grant, accepted by Melinda Polk.
Polk said the grant will be used for innovative teaching methods.
• the golf tournament April 25 raised more than $13,000.
• heard Rotary Club member Lou Talbot received $25 for perfect attendance.
• heard Mike Moore and Ronnie Davis win two free tickets to the Perot Museum.
• heard District 5830 is up by 14 members since 2013, seven of which are from the Rotary Club of Cedar Creek Lake.

Apr

17

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : April 17, 2014

Courtesy Photo Sarah Maples chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution member Sue Ann Hall (from left), registrar Geneice Morris and members Clara Belle Roundtree and Ruth Shelton prepare for the Lineage Research Workshop Thursday, April 22 at the Tri-County Library.

Courtesy Photo
Sarah Maples chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution member Sue Ann Hall (from left), registrar Geneice Morris and members Clara Belle Roundtree and Ruth Shelton prepare for the Lineage Research Workshop Tuesday, April 22 at the Tri-County Library.

Assistance getting proof to join available

Special to The Monitor
MABANK–The Sarah Maples chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is helping prospective members get their papers in order with a Lineage Research Workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, at the Tri-County Library.
The workshop is free and includes a light lunch and materials. Pre-registeration is requested by Friday, April 18.
Sarah Maples Registrar Geneice Morris handles new members wanting to join DAR.
She helps by showing ladies where to look for the proof needed to join.
Sue Ann Hall and Clara Belle Roundtree are working on their papers currently with assistance from Ruth Shelton.
Tri-County Library is located at 132 E. Market St., in Mabank.
To register, contact Vice Regent Suzanne Fife at (903) 432-3130 or shfife@nctv.com.

Apr

06

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : April 6, 2014

Courtesy Photo Rootseekers President Margaret  Ann Trail (from left) stands with guest speaker Bob Stokes and Julie Gustafson.

Courtesy Photo
Rootseekers President Margaret Ann Trail (from left) stands with guest speaker Bob Stokes and Julie Gustafson.

Special to The Monitor
MABANK– Rootseeker members heard Bob Stokes speak about the history of calendars at the Tri-County Library in Mabank March 17.
The Gregorian calendar, also called the Western calendar and the Christian calendar, is internationally the most widely used civil calendar. It has been the unofficial global standard for decades, recognized by international institutions such as the United Nations and the Universal Postal Union.
Beginning in 45 B.C., many parts of the world used the Julian calendar to mark the passage of time. By the Julian calendar, March 25 was the first day of the year and each year was 365 days and six hours long.
In 1583, Pope Gregory X111 determined the Julian calendar was incorrect, each day was just a little bit too long and the human calendar wasn’t keeping up with nature’s calendar. To solve the problem, Pope Gregory X111 created what is known as the Gregorian calendar.
This new calendar changed the first day of the year to January 1 and also jumped ahead by 10 days to make up for the lost time.
England and the American Colonies didn’t officially accept it until 1752. By the time England and the colonies adopted the new calendar, the discrepancy between the calendars was 11 days. To resolve the discrepancy, the government ordered Sept. 2, 1752, be followed by Sept. 14, 1752. Some people also added 11 days to their birth dates (a fact which is not noted on their birth certificates).
The reform was adopted initially by the Catholic countries of Europe. Protestants and Eastern Orthodox countries continued to use the traditional Julian calendar and adopted the Gregorian reform after a time for the sake of convenience in international trade. The last European country to adopt the reform was Greece in 1923.
Stokes was born in Pascagoula, Miss. He attended high school in Dallas. After two years at Baylor University, he served four years in the U.S. Coast Guard, then returned to Baylor to complete his Bachelor’s of Arts and Masters Degrees and 60 hours of graduate work at the University of North Texas.
He is married and has two children and two grandchildren.