Feb

12

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : February 12, 2015

Monitor Photo/Ronald Wheeler Artist John Fannin, of Tool, shows a wide array of pottery at the Rotary Club of Cedar Creek Lake meeting at the Cedar Creek Country Club Feb. 6.

Monitor Photo/Ronald Wheeler
Artist John Fannin, of Tool, shows a wide array of pottery at the Rotary Club of Cedar Creek Lake meeting at the Cedar Creek Country Club Feb. 6.

Tool man creates pottery with character

By Robyn Wheeler
Special to The Monitor
KEMP–Local potter John Fannin told Rotarians about his life’s work as an artist, how he is starting over in Tool and the sarcasm and humor found in his trademark face jugs at their weekly meeting at the Cedar Creek Country Club Feb. 6.
“My parents and grandparents came from Mabank and Log Cabin,” Fannin said. “And I worked many years with my brother on a tree farm in Dallas.”
Fannin moved to Colorado in 2004 to pursue an interest an art including metal sculpturing, painting and pottery.
“I wanted to know everything about art in all trades. I studied the American Folk period very heavily. It changed my life.”
After the passing of several family members, Fannin’s work slowed down and he was indecisive as to where to go and how to move on. With the help of his sister, he moved back to Texas about six months ago and has picked up where he left off.
“Many centuries ago, the potter’s trade was a necessity and local shops were located in town next to the hotel, barber shop, general store and post office.
Fannin opened a pottery shop in the Colorado mountains with an outdoor gallery allowing visitors to watch him work.
He also gave glazing and pottery lessons to anyone who wanted to learn the trade.
“I wanted to give back. I was blessed to have so many people who gave me that knowledge. I want to give back and continue to receive.” Fannin said.
“Starting over again is all about having faith in God, the people around you and yourself,” Fannin said.
Fannin creates bowls, pie plates, and other usual pottery but his niche is with face jugs.
“I just think they’re fun and they sell,” he said. “I try to add sarcasm and humor into every piece.”
Each of Fannin’s face jugs and art work are one-of-a-kind and usually sell for upward of $150.
Fannin says he enjoys encouraging people to do things they want to do and step out of their comfort zone.
“I hope to begin classes here in the lake area soon. I’m working on a location and various times which would accommadate residents the best,” Fannin said.
To view more of Fannin’s art work, go to www.jwfannin.com.
For more information, contact Fannin at (719) 293-1839 or jwfannin@-gmail.com.

Feb

08

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : February 8, 2015

Courtesy Photo  Kaufman County Master Gardeners’ Spring Seminar “Aquaponics: Growing Fish and Plants Together” is set for Feb. 28 at Grace Fellowship Church in Oak Grove.

Courtesy Photo
Kaufman County Master Gardeners’ Spring Seminar “Aquaponics: Growing Fish and Plants Together” is set for Feb. 28 at Grace Fellowship Church in Oak Grove.

Learn to grow fish and plants together

Special to The Monitor
KAUFMAN–Kaufman County Master Gardeners present their Spring Seminar “Aquaponics: Growing Fish and Plants Together” at 9 a.m. Saturday Feb. 28, at Grace Fellowship Church in Oak Grove.
Aquaponics is a soil-free, herbicide-free, pesticide-free method for producing naturally-grown, healthy, fresh vegetables and fish locally.
While aquaponics is not really new, it is enjoying a resurgence of interest. Both commercial growers and home gardeners are attracted to aquaponics because it requires less space, only 5 percent water and up to 70 percent less energy than conventional gardens.
In addition, yields are higher and growing time is shorter.
Bay City Texas AgriLife Extension Center Extension Fisheries Program Specialist Peter Woods will discuss the difference between aqua- and hydroponics, the basic concepts of aquaponics, suitable plants and fish, and examples of some commercial operations.
Green Phoenix Farms in Mansfield Adam Cohen will discuss aquaponic systems suitable for the backyard gardener.
Grace Fellowship Church is located at 7650 FM 1388 in Oak Grove.
For more information, contact Sharon Burden at (972) 932-9069 or sbburden@ag.tamu.edu.

Feb

01

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : February 1, 2015

Courtesy Photo Rootseekers Genealogical Society President Margaret Ann Trail (right) and member Julie Gustafson (left) present Henderson County Historical Commission member Phyllis Vermillion with a Certificate of Appreciation at their meeting Jan. 19.

Courtesy Photo
Rootseekers Genealogical Society President Margaret Ann Trail (right) and member Julie Gustafson (left) present Henderson County Historical Commission member Phyllis Vermillion with a Certificate of Appreciation at their meeting Jan. 19.


Special to The Monitor
MABANK–Henderson County Historical Commission representative Phyllis Vermillion spoke to the Rootseekers Genealogical Society at the Tri-County Library in downtown Mabank Jan. 19.
The historical commission, in accordance with the State Historical Commission, works to protect and preserve Henderson County’s historic and prehistoric resources for the use, education, enjoyment and economic benefit of present and future generations.
Members, appointed by the Henderson County Commissioners’ Court, serve two-year terms.
Vermillion said the commission is in possession of 7,200 old marriage records and is seeking family members to claim them.
The records were never picked up after being recorded beginning in 1893 and span several counties including Van Zandt, Smith, Anderson, Henderson, Navarro and Kaufman.
To receive a marriage record, fill out an application stating how you are related.
The commission also possesses Civil War pension records and approves the more than 16,000 historical markers posted throughout Texas near landmarks on the side of roads, in parks, cemeteries, and in front of old homes and courthouses.
To receive a historical marker, you must do your research and the commission will even help you.
Vermillion was a teacher and school librarian until she retired in 2008.
She went to work for the commission because she did not enjoy being retired.
Rootseekers meetings are held at 7 p.m. the third Monday of each month at the Tri-County Library in downtown Mabank.
Anyone interested in knowing more about their ancestors is welcome.
Research assistance is available from 9:30 a.m. to noon Tuesday mornings in the genealogy room.
The Henderson County Historical Commission is located in the old jail at 201 East Larkin Street, in Athens one block north from the courthouse. It is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.