Nov

20

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : November 20, 2014

Courtesy Photo Dottie Fink wins a $100 Walmart gift certificate at the Jeanie Hulsey Bridge Benefit Oct. 23.

Courtesy Photo
Dottie Fink wins a $100 Walmart gift certificate at the Jeanie Hulsey Bridge Benefit Oct. 23.


Special to The Monitor
TOOL–The Literary Club of Cedar Creek Lake raised $3,112 at the Jeanie Hulsey Bridge Benefit Oct. 23 held at at the Cedar Creek Lake United Methodist Church in Tool.
Added to past years, the bridge tournament has raised $45,676 for The Library at Cedar Creek Lake.
Two divisions played and Bridge Studio owner Gloria Rowland acted as the director of the sanctioned duplicate division. Ruth Pimm and Judy Scott co-chaired the event.
Donated prizes were awarded to the winners of both divisions. Dottie Fink was the winner of the donated $100 gift card.
Literary Club members worked in the kitchen to serve luncheon to the players.
The Literary Club meets every second Tuesday of the month at 9:30 a.m. at The Library at Cedar Creek.
Guests are welcome.
For membership information, call President Rosalie Randall at (903) 498-8333.
More photos from this event can be found in the Thursday, November 20, 2014 issue of The Monitor.

Nov

06

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : November 6, 2014

Courtesy Photo Eustace FFA Show Team members (from left) Helen Bobbitt, Jodie Costlow, Jordyn Costlow, Chad Tindel, Kelly Ashton, Brooke Reynolds and Sunni Goodell placed in the Van Livestock Show.

Courtesy Photo
Eustace FFA Show Team members (from left) Helen Bobbitt, Jodie Costlow, Jordyn Costlow, Chad Tindel, Kelly Ashton, Brooke Reynolds and Sunni Goodell placed in the Van Livestock Show.


Special to The Monitor
EUSTACE–The Eustace FFA Show Team participated in at the Van Livestock Show.
Jordyn Costlow won Grand and Reserve Champion American Heifer and Champion Prospect Steer.
Chad Tindel took first place with his progress steer and two second places with his prospect steers.
In the market lamb show, Sunni Goodell placed second in class and Helen Bobbitt placed third in class.
In the market goat show, Jodie Costlow placed third, junior member Madison Hunt placed fifth, Kelly Ashton placed sixth and Brooke Reynolds placed seventh.

Oct

09

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : October 9, 2014

Monitor Photo/Robyn Wheeler Gun Barrel City Attorney Jeff Irion (left) accepts a Rotary Club mug from Rotary Club President-elect Abdul Abdin at the Cedar Creek Country Club at the Oct. 2 meeting.

Monitor Photo/Robyn Wheeler
Gun Barrel City Attorney Jeff Irion (left) accepts a Rotary Club mug from Rotary Club President-elect Abdul Abdin at the Cedar Creek Country Club at the Oct. 2 meeting.


By Robyn Wheeler
Monitor Staff Writer

KEMP–Gun Barrel City Attorney Jeff Irion spoke to Rotary Club members Oct. 2 at the Cedar Creek Country Club about things to consider when creating a will.
“Wills are a good thing to have because whomever you are leaving behind does not need the burden of trying to figure it out,” Irion said.
If everything a person owns is community property, the spouse will automatically get everything. But a will written by an attorney is simpler and is not dependent on a court’s approval.
Handwritten and oral deathbed declarations can be done but may not be accepted in Texas.
“It is better than nothing,” Irion said.
Irion cautioned to be careful when a previous marriage or kids from previous marriage are being taken into account. “If you have more children after making a will, you can have your will revised,” Irion said.
A power of attorney may be appointed so you have a say on who will be your guardian in the event you need in-home care or to be placed in a nursing home.
“You can specify who can and cannot care for you,” Irion said.
Estate probates were also addressed as they can simplify many aspects of probate. Most joint bank accounts have rights of survivorship and are not part of probate estate.
“There is no normal when it comes to wills,” Irion said. Some people give everything to their kids and some people leave everything to charities. It is important you feel comfortable with your decision and everything is transparent,” Irion said.
A person can also add a trust for children or young adults to protect against frivilous spending.
“Trusts can be made for those not mature enough to make good decisions,” Irion said.
“Trusts can be made for adults up to to 25 years old. The trustee can disburse the money over a period of time or withhold all of it,” he added.
“Most people want to maintain control of their home until they die but this can become a problem when dealing with Medicaid,” Irion said.
Medicaid allows a person to have $2,100 a month coming in for nursing care. Anything over that, a person may be disqualified. If a person sells their house, the government will disavow it.
“Be careful when proceeding with elderly care. Chart out what to do with your parent’s estate. Make use of all the information available on the Internet or with an attorney,” Irion said.
“If you bring in $3,500, the extra money will be put in trust and paid to the nursing home. The patient will be given a stipend. When the person dies, you will have to reimburse the state for the care,” Irion said.
“Go into this with your eyes open. There are significant fines for doing something wrong,” Irion said.
In other news, Rotarians heard:
• the Klothes for Kids event is Wednesday-Thursday, Oct. 22-23, at Walmart.