Jul

17

‘Petticoat Junction’-like cafe to be torn down

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : July 17, 2013

Monitor Photo/Pearl Cantrell A long white building called the Cafeteria Truck Stop, reminiscent of the railroad cafe and hotel in the 1963 television serial “Petticoat Junction,” is coming down. City council members approved the demolition order for the Business 175 building sitting on property across from the Mabank Junior High, earlier this month.

Monitor Photo/Pearl Cantrell
A long white building called the Cafeteria Truck Stop, reminiscent of the railroad cafe and hotel in the 1963 television serial “Petticoat Junction,” is coming down. City council members approved the demolition order for the Business 175 building sitting on property across from the Mabank Junior High, earlier this month.

By David Webb
The Monitor Correspondent

MABANK–In 1963, a popular television sitcom called “Petticoat Junction” aired on CBS, and a local café of the same named attracted local residents and travelers on Business Highway 175.
That was in the days before the four-lane U.S. Highway 175 routed traffic around Kemp and Mabank, and the long white building that reminded people of the fictional hotel and café portrayed on the television show drew sufficient traffic as the “Cafeteria Truck Stop.”
That was decades ago, and the Petticoat Junction café is as distant of a memory as the television show that first aired in 1963, and finished its run in 1970.
The television show portrayed the life of people living in the country on a railroad line.
Since the local cafe closed, longer ago than anyone can readily remember, the building at 823 W. Mason has deteriorated to the point that the Mabank City Council ordered it demolished during its July 2 meeting. The building’s owner, George W. Sheffield, reportedly did not object to it being torn down, according to city officials.
City secretary Fairy Gonzalez said the building contains mold, and there is a swimming pool in back covered by a net that is considered dangerous and a breeding ground for mosquitos.
“It is just not up to city code, and the owner cannot bring it up to standard in the time frame that would be required,” Gonazlez said.
“It is a health issue,” she explained.
In other business, the council:
• adopted building, residential, fire, plumbing, mechanical, gas, energy conversation codes bringing them up to 2012 international standards.
• approved new building, plumbing and electrical fees.
• approved an interlocal agreement with Kaufman County for the maintenance of city roads that would require reimbursement from the city for the cost of road materials used.

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