Dec

09

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : December 9, 2016

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By Rollin Hadsell
Monitor Staff Writer
MABANK–Although the Mabank Lady Panthers had trouble scoring, the defense stepped up to take care of business in a low-scoring 27-23 win against Crandall Dec. 6 at Mabank High School gym.
The way the Lady Panthers played the first quarter, it looked as if the game was going to be a blowout.
Junior guard Izzy Hardy got the Lady Panthers on the board first with a bucket at the 6:55 mark.
Less than a minute later, junior guard Kathryne German scored the first two of her nine points in the first period when she nailed a short jumper to make it 4-0.
Senior post Leigh Cunningham made it 6-0 and German added another bucket to make it 8-0 with 3:24 left. Crandall did not get on the board until they hit a shot with 3:11 left in the period. German nailed two more baskets and added a free-throw to give the Lady Panthers a 13-4 lead going into the second quarter.
In the second quarter, both defenses picked up the pace and would not allow the other to score.
The Lady Panthers scored their only bucket of the half on a three-pointer by Hardy with 1:24 remaining in the half.
The Mabank defense, however, was up to the task, holding Crandall to just four points in the quarter. Mabank led 16-8 at halftime.
The third quarter was much like the second, in that the two teams had trouble finding the basket. Crandall scored the first bucket of the quarter with 6:40 remaining.
The two defenses again took over as the Lady Panthers finally scored with 1:12 left in the quarter on a lay-up by sophomore guard Brianna Martin to extend their lead to 18-12. Crandall scored late in the period to make it 18-14 heading into the fourth quarter.
The Lady Panthers found the range in the fourth quarter.
Cunningham made the score 20-14 on a basket with just over six minutes to go in the quarter. After a Crandall basket, Cunningham struck again with another basket to keep the lead at six points for the Lady Panthers. Leading 22-20 with 3:56 remaining in the game, German scored her 10th and 11th points of the game to stretch the lead to four. Crandall scored again to make it 24-22 with 1:49 remaining, but would only get one more point on a free-throw with 27 seconds remaining. Senior guard Carson Marsh added a free-throw to make it 25-22 and Cunningham would score again to make it 27-22.
The Lady Panther defense shut down Crandall from that point on.
German paced the Lady Panthers with 11 points. Cunningham added eight points and Hardy chipped in five points in the win. Martin had two points and Marsh added one point on the night.
The Lady Panthers will be traveling to Martin’s Mill to take on the Lady Mustangs at a time yet to be determined Tuesday Dec. 13.

Dec

09

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : December 9, 2016

john-glenn-space

COLUMBUS, OHIO.–American space hero and longtime Ohio U.S. senator John Glenn died Thursday at the age of 95. He had been hospitalized for more than a week at the James Cancer Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.
Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth in a flight lasting just five hours aboard the Friendship 7 capsule in 1962. He was 40 years old for that historic flight on Feb. 20, 1962 from Cape Canaveral.
He was 77 years old at the time he became the oldest space traveler. He spent nine days aboard the space shuttle Discovery.
NASA tailored a series of geriatric-reaction experiments to create a scientific purpose for Glenn’s mission, but there was more to it than that: a revival of the excitement of the earliest days of the space race, a public relations bonanza and the gift of a lifetime.
“America owed John Glenn a second flight,” NASA Administrator Dan Goldin said.
A news conference from space in 1998 said, “To look out at this kind of creation out here and not believe in God is to me impossible.”
However, Glenn’s passion for flight took hold on him from his youth, being lived out as a fighter and test pilot for the U.S. Marine Corp. in World War II and Korea racking up 149 combat missions. He continued to pilot his own plane until the age of 90.
As a test pilot, he broke aviation records.
Glenn’s public life began when he broke the transcontinental airspeed record, bursting from Los Angeles to New York City in three hours, 23 minutes and 8 seconds. With his Crusader averaging 725 mph, the 1957 flight proved the jet could endure stress when pushed to maximum speeds over long distances.
In New York, he got a hero’s welcome — his first tickertape parade. He got another after his flight on Friendship 7.
That mission also introduced Glenn to politics. He addressed a joint session of Congress, and dined at the White House. He became friends with President Kennedy and ally and friend of his brother, Robert. The Kennedys urged him to enter politics, and after a difficult few starts he did.
Glenn spent 24 years in the U.S. Senate, representing Ohio longer than any other senator in the state’s history. He announced his impending retirement in 1997, 35 years to the day after he became the first American in orbit, saying, “There is still no cure for the common birthday.”
Glenn joked he was envious of a fellow astronaut and Ohioan: Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon.
“I’ve been very fortunate to have a lot of great experiences in my life and I’m thankful for them,” he said in 2012.
In 1943, Glenn married his childhood sweetheart, Anna Margaret Castor. They met when they were toddlers, and when she had mumps as a teenager, he came to her house, cut a hole in her bedroom window screen, and passed her a radio to keep her company, a friend recounted.
“I don’t remember the first time I told Annie I loved her, or the first time she told me,” Glenn would write in his memoir. “It was just something we both knew.” He bought her a diamond engagement ring in 1942 for $125. It’s never been replaced.
They had two children, Carolyn and John David.
He and his wife, Annie, split their later years between Washington and Columbus. Both served as trustees at their alma mater, Muskingum College. Glenn spent time promoting the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at Ohio State University, which also houses an archive of his private papers and photographs.

Dec

09

Posted by : Monitor Admin | On : December 9, 2016

By Pearl Cantrell
Monitor Staff Writer
SEVEN POINTS–Sunday night Dec. 4. traffic was stopped on State Highway 274 in Seven Points while a helicopter was landed to evacuate a man to a Tyler hospital following a collision.
Jerry Starek, 52, was taken by air in critical but stable condition after having collided with through traffic on the busy highway around 7 p.m. Dec. 4.
According to police, Starek, who was alone, was attempting to cross SH 274 from the gas station at the blinking light onto Jess Hinton Road when the off-road utility Yamaha Rhino vehicle he was operating was struck by a 2008 Ford-150 pick-up truck.
Three people from this vehicle were checked out at Athens-East Texas Medical Center. Two went by ground ambulance; a third provided his own transportation. There were four in the truck, police chief administrator Raymond Wennerstrom said.